Mood Nation App from Team Indifferent takes the first position

Our Android hackathon successfully brought together innovators and thinkers under one roof on 29th and 30th March 2014 at Microsoft Accelerator. With elections round the corner and the theme revolving around mobilizing voters, hackers got together for 24 hours and put forth their creative best.

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In Pic: Team Indifferent with Nikhil from Nokia(extreme right)

We take immense pride in announcing our first winner- Team Indifferent from eBay. The team had Karishma Sureka, Shikha Singh, Ankur Sarda and Deepak Malhotra. Their app Mood Nation predicts the mood of the electorate via sentiment analysis of social media activity. We got in touch with the team to know more about their app. Their team representative Deepak cordially responded to our questions. Here’s an excerpt of the conversation-

What programming languages did you use?
We primarily used JAVA as our backend programming language and ANDROID SDK for the frontend development of the Android application.

Which version of Android will your app support?
It supports Android ICS(4.0) and above.

What are the open source libraries you have used?
Twitter4J- to capture tweets based on Twitter handles and hashtags.
Alchemy API- for sentiment analysis, to get feedback on what kind of sentiment is conveyed by the tweets of critics, politicians and “janta”.
Jersey framework- For backend RESTful web services, we used JAXRS based jersey framework in java

How did you go about testing your app? When are you planning to launch?
We tested it on our own devices which we carried during the hackathon, a Nexus 7 Tablet and Nexus 5 Phone. We are working on enhancing the User Experience bit while also making sure the application is fully functional and planning to launch it by month end.

What is your stance on your application’s security?
Unlike other social android applications, we don’t ask our users to log in with their Twitter account in order to access the application. That’s a huge advantage in terms of ease of use for naive users and from the security aspect too. Also, since the application makes use of public Twitter feeds that are available on Twitter, we are not intruding any Twitter user’s privacy. The application doesn’t read/write any sort of data on a phone so users can safely go about and use Mood Nation.

What sources do you credit for help?
The documentation of the open source libraries we used was of great help since this was the first time we were working on a twitter based tool. So a crisp and clear documentation made it really easy for us to quickly hack and build a working prototype. Also, the judges and organizers of the Venturesity hackathon had great inputs on what other features we can incorporate into the application which made us think beyond our initial plan and build a better app.

 

We, at Venturesity look forward to witnessing the launch of the app in Playstore. With so much potential, we are sure Mood Nation will top the download charts after it hits the market. We wish the best for our winners in their future endeavors, and also look forward having them with us in our next hackathon.

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